The Trump Lie Fact Checker From The Washington Post

The 100 most recent lies...

“We have the highest stock market we've ever had.”

Repeated 57 times
This is a flip-flop for Trump. Before he was elected, he dismissed the stock-market performance under Obama as “artificial” and “a bubble."

“We have the lowest unemployment in 17 years.”

Repeated 33 times

Trump now uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics unemployment rate to say this, which is a flip-flop from his previous claims dismissing the BLS unemployment rate as "nonsense."

“And companies are moving into the United States. A lot of companies are moving. They're moving back. They want to be there. The enthusiasm levels are the highest ever recorded on the charts.”

Repeated 55 times

Trump keeps taking credit for projects that were long in the works before he became president. For example, he repeatedly claims credit for Ford’s decision to abandon its plans to open a factory in Mexico and instead expand its Michigan plant. But analysts say Ford’s decision has more to do with the company’s long-term goal — particularly, its plans to invest in electric vehicles — than the administration. Foxconn considered investing in U.S.-based facilities since 2014, though its initial plans to invest in Pennsylvania didn't pan out. Trump keeps celebrating the company's decision, but the Wisconsin Legislature had not yet approved the $3 billion incentives package amid concerns from taxpayers.

“We've made some very big steps with respect to trade, far bigger than anything you know, in addition to about $300 billion in sales to various companies, including China -- that was $250 billion and going up very substantially from that.”

Trump as usual oversells the value of the deals that were announced in China. Many of the arrangements are nonbinding memorandums rather than legal contracts. For instance, the largest single project unveiled was China Energy Investment Corp.’s plan to invest $83.7 billion in power generation, chemical manufacturing, and underground storage of natural gas liquids and derivatives in West Virginia. But the two sides signed only a memorandum of understanding, not a formal contract, and the dollar figure covers a 20-year period, the state said.

NOV 13 2017

"We've made a lot of big progress on trade. We have deficits with almost everybody. Those deficits are going to be cut very quickly and very substantially.”

On his Asian trip, Trump had little apparent success in attracting countries to his vision of bilateral trade deals. In fact, the other 11 countries in the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) announced they would move forward with the multilateral agreement even though Trump quit the agreement. The odds that trade deficits, years in the making, would be "cut very quaickly and very substantially" are rather low indeed.

NOV 12 2017

"There weren’t 17 as was previously reported; there were actually four. But they were saying there was 17; there were actually four.”

Repeated 1 time

Trump uses a rhetorical trick of trying to undermine the results of the Russia assessment by saying it was just three or four agencies, not all 17 intelligence agencies. The report was jointly issued by the Central Intelligence Agency, National Security Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation and Director of National Intelligence. The DNI is an umbrella organization that oversees all 17 intelligence agencies.

NOV 12 2017

"By the way, Hillary Clinton had the reset button. She wanted to get back together with Russia. She even spelled 'reset' wrong. That's how it started, and then it got worse.”

Trump suggests a translation flub led to a decline in relations with Russia. Much like the Trump administration, the incoming Obama administration wanted to reset relations after the George W. Bush had reacted negatively to Russia's attack on Georgia. The Obama outreach coincided with Vladimir Putin stepping back from the presidency for a term. Relations improved while Dmitry Medvedev was president, but then soured again when Putin reclaimed the presidency.

NOV 12 2017

"I got to tour parts of Vietnam, and it's really looking well. It's looking beautiful. And the people are happy, and the people are waving, and they like the United States; perhaps they like me. But they were really lined up in the streets by the tens of thousands, and we very much appreciate that.”

There were crowds, but not in the tens of thousands, according to videos and reporter accounts.

NOV 11 2017

"Putin "said he didn't meddle. He said he didn't meddle. I asked him again. You can only ask so many times. But I just asked him again, and he said he absolutely did not meddle in our election. He did not do what they're saying he did.”

Trump indicated he had discussed election meddling in a meeting with Putin but Putin's office said the subject did not come up.

NOV 11 2017

"Because of the lack of a relationship that we have with Russia because of this artificial thing that's happening with this Democratic-inspired thing, we could really be helped a lot, tremendously, with Russia having to do with North Korea....this artificial Democratic hit job gets in the way. It gets in the way. And that's a shame because people will die because of it. And it's a pure hit job. And it's artificially induced.”

Repeated 29 times

Trump repeatedly claims the Russia investigation is made up or "Democratic-inspired," but the information on Russian efforts to sway the 2016 election was developed by the intelligence community and published in a declassified report, in which the agencies said they had "high confidence" it was correct. Whether or not there was collusion is still under investigation.

NOV 11 2017

"Then you look, and you look at what's going on with Podesta, and you look at what's going on with the server from the DNC and why didn't the FBI take it, why did they leave it; why did a third party look at the server and not the FBI -- if you look at all of this stuff, and you say, what's going on here?”

Repeated 8 times
The FBI and the Democratic National Committee disagree on whether the FBI requested access to the DNC's servers. FBI Director James Comey testified to the Senate Intelligence Committee that the bureau made "multiple requests at different levels" to access DNC's servers, but the DNC said the FBI never requested access. The DNC ultimately allowed a private company to review its database and share findings with the FBI.

NOV 11 2017

"I mean, give me a break. They're political hacks. So you look at it -- I mean, you have [John] Brennan, you have [James] Clapper, and you have [James] Comey. Comey is proven now to be a liar and he's proven to be a leaker.”

Brennan, Clapper and Comey spent their professional lives in the intelligence and law enforcement worlds and thus are not political hacks. There is no proof that Comey lied about his interactions with Trump.

NOV 11 2017

"Then you hear it's 17 agencies. Well, it's three.”

Repeated 1 time

Trump uses a rhetorical trick of trying to undermine the results of the Russia assessment by saying it was just three or four agencies, not all 17 intelligence agencies. The report was jointly issued by the Central Intelligence Agency, National Security Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation and Director of National Intelligence. The DNI is an umbrella organization that oversees all 17 intelligence agencies.

NOV 11 2017

"Believe it or not, even when I'm in Washington and New York, I do not watch much television.”

This is not a believable statement. Trump clearly watches a lot of TV, judging from his Twitter feed.

"President Xi of China "made a statement that he's committed to stopping the nuclearization of North Korea. That's a big statement.”

Xi and other leaders of China have often said this. There was nothing new or remarkable about Xi's statement.

“Look, we have a $71 billion trade deficit with Mexico.”

Repeated 1 time
Trump often exaggerates Mexico's trade deficit, by only counting goods, not services. It was $56 billion in 2016.

“There are few countries we have a surplus with, and those countries it's like a two-dollar surplus. It's disgraceful.”

Repeated 3 times

The United States has trade surpluses with many countries, including Argentina, Australia, Brazil, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom.

“Our trade deals are so bad. Last year, we lost $800 billion, right? Yeah. $800 [billion], approximately. Check it. But approximately $800 billion on trade.”

The trade deficit in goods and services in 2016 was $500 billion. Trump often just cites the goods deficit, which was $752 billion, according to the Census Bureau. But trade in services ran a substantial surplus.

“I saw Dianne Feinstein the other day and I respect her. She was on television the other day saying there's no collusion. The Democrats -- the Republicans come out screaming it, but the Democrats come out, and they say, 'No, there's no collusion.' There is no collusion. There's nothing.”

Feinstein (D-Calif.), a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, did not flatly say there was no collusion and instead was more nuanced. Asked by CNN's Jake Tapper on Nov. 5 whether she had "seen any evidence that this dirt, these emails, were ever given to the Trump campaign,” she replied: “Not so far." Tapper than asked: “Have you seen any communications that suggested that the Trump campaign wanted them to release them through a different means?” She answered: “I have not."

“We have a $30 billion trade deficit with South Korea.”

Trump, as is his practice, inflates the size of the trade deficit by only counting goods, not good and services. The 2016 trade deficit with South Korea was $17 billion.

“We have a $70 billion trade deficit with Japan.”

Trump, as is his practice, inflates the size of the trade deficit by only counting goods, not good and services. The 2016 trade deficit with Japan was $55 billion.

“Unemployment is at its lowest level in 17 years.”

Repeated 33 times

Trump now uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics unemployment rate to say this, which is a flip-flop from his previous claims dismissing the BLS unemployment rate as "nonsense."

“The stock market is at an all-time high.”

Repeated 57 times

This is a flip-flop for Trump. Before he was elected, he dismissed the stock-market performance under Obama as “artificial” and “a bubble."

“I don’t blame China, I blame the incompetence of past Admins for allowing China to take advantage of the U.S. on trade leading up to a point where the U.S. is losing $100's of billions. How can you blame China for taking advantage of people that had no clue? I would've done same!”

Trump blasts previous administrations for letting trade deficits with China to climb. But the United States is not losing "100s of billions of dollars" on trade deficits. That reflects a fundamental misunderstanding. A trade deficit simply means that people in one country are buying more goods from another country than people in the second country are buying from the first country. Americans want to buy these products from overseas, either because of quality or price. If Trump sparked a trade war and tariffs were increased on Chinese goods, then it would raise the cost of those products to Americans. Perhaps that would reduce the purchases of those goods, and thus reduce the trade deficit, but that would not mean the United States would “gain” money that had been lost.

“Congratulations to all of the 'DEPLORABLES' and the millions of people who gave us a MASSIVE (304-227) Electoral College landslide victory!”

Repeated 7 times

According to a tally by John Pitney of Claremont McKenna College, every Republican president since Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876 won a larger share of the electoral college votes than Trump, with the exception of George W. Bush (twice) and Nixon in 1968.

“@EdWGillespie will totally turn around the high crime and poor economic performance of VA. MS-13 and crime will be gone. Vote today, ASAP!”

Virginia has among the lowest crime and unemployment rates in the United States.

“Ed Gillespie worked hard but did not embrace me or what I stand for. Don’t forget, Republicans won 4 out of 4 House seats, and with the economy doing record numbers, we will continue to win, even bigger than before!”

Trump, who tweeted repeatedly in favor of Gillespie, ignores a House race in which the Republican lost.

“Stock market hit yet another all-time record high yesterday.”

Repeated 57 times

This is a flip-flop for Trump. Before he was elected, he dismissed the stock-market performance under Obama as “artificial” and “a bubble."

“The deal is so bad for rich people, I had to throw in the estate tax just to give them something.”

No matter how you slice it, the superwealthy do rather well under the House GOP proposal. Not only do they benefit from a reduction in tax rates, but there are numerous other provisions that benefits the wealthy, including repeal of the alternative minimum tax and lower rate for pass-through entities. The top one percent end up with about 47 percent of the tax cuts, according to the Tax Policy Center.

“The U.S., under my administration, is completely rebuilding its military, and they're spending hundreds of billions of dollars to the newest and finest military equipment anywhere in the world, being built right now. I want peace through strength!”

Repeated 14 times

This is false. Trump's proposed ten percent increase is actually relatively modest. In the past 30 years, at least one-third of the time the core defense budget was boosted more than Trump's request--in some cases more than double the percentage requested by Trump.

“The United States is going through something of a miracle itself. Our stock market is at an all-time high.”

Repeated 57 times

This is a flip-flop for Trump. Before he was elected, he dismissed the stock-market performance under Obama as “artificial” and “a bubble." He also inherited a thriving economy, so not much of a miracle.

“Unemployment is at a 17-year low.”

Repeated 33 times

Trump now uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics unemployment rate to say this, which is a flip-flop from his previous claims dismissing the BLS unemployment rate as "nonsense."

“In 2005, after years of diplomacy, the dictatorship agreed to ultimately abandon its nuclear programs and return to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation. But it never did. And worse, it tested the very weapons it said it was going to give up.”

The agreement reached in the Six-Party talks was more ambiguous than Trump indicates, as it suggested that the parties would provide North Korea with light-water nuclear reactors. (That was certainly Pyongyang's interpretation.) Indeed, the statement said the regime would "abandon" its weapons rather than the American-preferred phrase of "dismantle." In any case, the agreement quickly fell part largely because the U.S. Treasury targeted a bank in Macao that handled cash for the North Korean leadership. The North Korean test convinced the George W. Bush administration to get serious about negotiations -- and to abandon the Treasury action.

“You look at the city with the strongest gun laws in our nation, is Chicago, and Chicago is a disaster. It's a total disaster.”

This claim about the impact of Chicago’s gun laws on gun violence relies on outdated gun laws and shoddy data. The state of Illinois has tough gun laws, but several of the most restrictive laws, such as a ban on handguns and a gun registry, are no longer in use. And while the city may have high instances of gun violence, it does not have the highest rate of gun violence.

“I have great confidence in King Salman and the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, they know exactly what they are doing. Some of those they are harshly treating have been “milking” their country for years!”

Trump praises an extrajudicial action in Saudi Arabia, which ordinarily the State Department would say was troubling. The arrests and detentions were down under the guise of thwarting corruption, but that's just a fig leaf that Trump appears to endorse.

“My visit to Japan and friendship with PM Abe will yield many benefits, for our great Country. Massive military & energy orders happening+++!”

The Japanese government immediately disputed this statement. The Japan Times quoted a defense official as saying: “We’ll proceed with the existing plan, without worrying about the president’s remarks.”

“The state of Virginia economy, under Democrat rule, has been terrible.”

Virginia has among the lowest unemployment rates in the United States -- lower than the rest of the country.

“The Prime Minister is ordering a lot of military equipment, as he should be -- as he should be with what's happening with one of your neighbors. So that is happening.”

Repeated 1 time

The Japanese government immediately disputed this statement. The Japan Times quoted a defense official as saying: “We’ll proceed with the existing plan, without worrying about the president’s remarks.”

“The United States is one of the highest-taxed nations in the world.”

Repeated 31 times

Trump almost never gets this correct. The Pew Research Center, using 2014 data, found that the tax bill for Americans, under various scenarios, is below average for developed countries. In 2014, according to comparative tables of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), revenue as a percentage of the gross domestic product — the broadest measure of the economy — was 26 percent for the United States. Out of 34 countries, that put the United States in the bottom third — and well below the OECD average of 34.4 percent.

“I've reduced regulations terrifically, frankly, if I do say so myself -- but at a level that nobody else has ever done. I've done more in nine months in terms of the reduction of regulations than any President has done in a full term, and it's not even close. ”

Repeated 10 times

This claim cannot be verified as there is not enough data for a comparison, but it's especially a stretch to say he's done more in nine month than any full term president.

“Our unemployment is at a 17-year low.”

Repeated 33 times

Trump now uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics unemployment rate to say this, which is a flip-flop from his previous claims dismissing the BLS unemployment rate as "nonsense."

“The stock market reached an all-time high on Friday, and that's the 61st, I believe -- something around that number -- 61st time that's happened.”

Repeated 57 times

This is a flip-flop for Trump. Before he was elected, he dismissed the stock-market performance under Obama as “artificial” and “a bubble."

“The Keystone Pipeline was dead. And the Dakota Access Pipeline was in even in worse shape because they built it but they weren't allowed to hook it up. So I consider not starting even better than that. And in my first week, I approved both. It's 42,000 jobs. The Dakota is already open and Keystone is starting; it's actually already started.”

Repeated 19 times

Trump appears to be combining two disputed figures — 28,000 jobs for Keystone XL and 12,000 for the Dakota Access Pipeline-- and then hyping it even more. We have looked closely at the Keystone numbers, and the same methodological issues appear to apply to the Dakota estimates. The actual number of Keystone construction jobs, for instance, is just 3,900 on an annualized basis — and other jobs have already been created (such as for building high-strength line pipe.) In the context of the U.S. economy, which just in October added 261,000 jobs, these are not many jobs. Meanwhile, Keystone still needs state approval for construction to start.

“You saw Broadcom is coming in -- top 100 company -- they announced on Thursday from the Oval Office.”

Repeated 2 times

Broadcom was once on the Fortune 500, but fell off in recent years.

“So one of the things, I think, that's very important is that the Prime Minister of Japan is going to be purchasing massive amounts of military equipment, as he should. And we make the best military equipment, by far. He'll be purchasing it from the United States.”

Repeated 1 time

The Japanese government immediately disputed this statement. The Japan Times {quoted} a defense official as saying: “We’ll proceed with the existing plan, without worrying about the president’s remarks.”

“I approved a power plant, which has been under consideration for 11 years, and they gave up, and I approved it. And it's a $7 billion plant. And the state wanted it and the local community wanted it, but they had environmental restrictions. And now it's being built.”

Trump appears to be referring to a recent $3.7 billion loan guarantee offered by the Trump administration to save a troubled nuclear power plant in Georgia. (The administration is trying to abolish the loan guarantee program but this loan would be grandfathered.) Costs for the plant have soared over $25 billion not because of environmental restrictions but because of construction delays caused by poor workmanship.

“On regulations, while I've reduced regulations terrifically. It would take, as an example, to build a highway -- it would take 17 to 20 years to get approvals. And at the end of 20th year, in many cases, they voted it down. Do you approve? No. So they wasted tens of millions of dollars. There's a highway in Maryland where it took exactly 17 years. And the original numbers were very little, and it ended up costing hundreds of millions of dollars for a very small, short highway. And we can't have that.”

Trump is referring to the Intercounty Connector, an 18.8-mile six-lane toll highway that cost $2.4 billion and was revived in 2003 and completed in 2014, though sections began opening in 2011. So that's either 8 or 11 years. There had long been controversy over the proposed highway, dating back to 1975, with opposition from local government officials, the Maryland general assembly and environmental groups. Trump is being misleading by attributing the delays to government regulations.

“When you look at that horrible dossier which is a total phony fake deal like so much of the news that I read when you look at that and take a look at what's gone on with that and the kind of money we're talking about it is a disgrace.”

Repeated 3 times

While the dossier commissioned by Fusion GPS for Democrats contained salacious elements, broad portions have proven to be largely correct. Fusion has said the former British spy who wrote it received $168,000. The FBI was sufficiently impressed that it considered pay him for additional research.

“You know Paul was not there very long. What people don't mention Paul was not there for a very long period of time.”

Manafort was Trump's campaign chairman in the critical period before and after the GOP convention.

“I guarantee you these countries they don't put their finest in the lottery system. They put people probably in many cases that they don't want.”

Repeated 1 time

The diversity visa fraud system has had instances of fraud but countries do not nominate or select people to participate.

“Democrats have been absolutely terrible on immigration because they want anybody to come in. You know they obstruct make it very tough and they want on immigration and crime. I mean they want people to just pour in over the border.”

Democrats generally do not advocate for illegal immigration.

“We're one of the highest taxed nations in the world. We're not competitive with other nations.”

Repeated 31 times

Trump almost never gets this correct. The Pew Research Center, using 2014 data, found that the tax bill for Americans, under various scenarios, is below average for developed countries. In 2014, according to comparative tables of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), revenue as a percentage of the gross domestic product — the broadest measure of the economy — was 26 percent for the United States. Out of 34 countries, that put the United States in the bottom third — and well below the OECD average of 34.4 percent.

“We've actually had a lot of bills passed despite what people think I think I heard that number 70 and it's almost a record.”

Repeated 8 times

Trump, unlike many presidents in their 10th month, has signed no major legislation. When Trump made his remarks, he has signed 82 bills, most of which were minor. Just among recent presidents, Jimmy Carter, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton had signed more bills than Trump at this point in their presidencies.

“You see what we've done with ISIS in eight months. I've done more than the previous administration done during the entire two terms of the administration.”

Repeated 10 times

By just about every metric, this is not correct. Obama set up virtually all the structure that did the key fighting under Trump, and more land was captured, fighters trained and munitions dropped under Obama than under Trump. The basic plan of attack in 2017 was also developed under Obama, though Trump appears to have speeded up the tempo.

“We are spending a lot of money on our military that we weren't spending over the past long period of time it's been depleted and now it's growing very fast.”

Repeated 14 times

This is false. Trump's proposed ten percent increase is actually relatively modest. In the past 30 years, at least one-third of the time the core defense budget was boosted more than Trump's request--in some cases more than double the percentage requested by Trump.

“NAFTA is horrible. The deal we have with South Korea is horrible. We have so many bad deals.”

Repeated 14 times

Trump’s attack on North American Free Trade Agreement is over the top. It is often difficult to separate out the impact of trade agreements on jobs, compared to other, broader economic trends. But the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service in 2015 concluded the “net overall effect of NAFTA on the U.S. economy appears to have been relatively modest, primarily because trade with Canada and Mexico accounts for a small percentage of U.S. GDP,” though it noted “there were worker and firm adjustment costs as the three countries adjusted to more open trade and investment among their economies.”

“Unemployment, back in the United States, is at a 17-year low.”

Repeated 33 times

Trump now uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics unemployment rate to say this, which is a flip-flop from his previous claims dismissing the BLS unemployment rate as "nonsense."

“The stock market is at an all-time high.”

Repeated 57 times

This is a flip-flop for Trump. Before he was elected, he dismissed the stock-market performance under Obama as “artificial” and “a bubble."

“Almost 2 million jobs have been added since a very, very special day; it's called Election Day, November 8th. Two million jobs.”

Trump is counting jobs from Election Day, even though he did not take office until almost three months later.

“The reason our stock market is so successful is because of me. I've always been great with money.”

Repeated 57 times

Trump, of course, has had four businesses go through bankruptcy proceedings -- and he nearly went under himself. Moreover, it's odd, to say the least, for a president to give himself credit for the rise in the stock market -- which before he won the presidency Trump called a "big fat bubble."

“Would very much appreciate Saudi Arabia doing their IPO of Aramco with the New York Stock Exchange. Important to the United States!”

The reason for the Saudi reluctance is because of passage of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, which could result in the seizure of Saudi assets. During the campaign, Trump strongly supported JASTA and blasted Obama for vetoing it. (Congress overturned Obama's veto.)

“Unemployment is down to 4.1%, lowest in 17 years. 1.5 million new jobs created since I took office. Highest stock Market ever, up $5.4 trill”

Repeated 33 times

Trump now uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics unemployment rate to say this, which is a flip-flop from his previous claims dismissing the BLS unemployment rate as "nonsense."

“New Donna B book says she paid for and stole the Dem Primary. What about the deleted E-mails, Uranium, Podesta, the Server, plus, plus.”

Repeated 10 times

Trump suggests the State Department under Hillary Clinton had sole approval authority on a uranium rights deal with a company largely owned by Russia’s nuclear energy agency. But the State Department is one of nine agencies in the Committee on Foreign Investments in the United States to vet and sign off on all U.S. transactions involving foreign governments. There is no evidence Clinton herself got involved in the deal personally, and it is highly questionable that this deal even rose to the level of the secretary of state. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission also needed to approve, and did approve, the transfer.

“Something we're seeing now is, for the first time in a long time, wages are starting to rise for people.”

Repeated 6 times

This is wrong. Wages have been rising steadily since 2014, for a gain of 7.3 percent over the past three years.

“Donna Brazile just stated the DNC RIGGED the system to illegally steal the Primary from Bernie Sanders. Bought and paid for by Crooked H. This is real collusion and dishonesty. Major violation of Campaign Finance Laws and Money Laundering.”

Repeated 1 time

Trump is referring to a financial arrangement the Clinton campaign had with the Democratic National Committee, which was similar to one the Trump campaign had with the Republican National Committee. It's no coincidence Trump would raise false charges of money laundering shortly after his former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, was indicted for money laundering.

“And one of the things about our taxes -- you talk about repatriation. We're bringing in probably -- I think the number is going to be over $4 trillion coming back into our country so it's going to be put to work.”

Repeated 16 times

There are no official, current numbers on the profits held overseas by U.S. companies, just estimates. The White House would not respond to a query on where Trump is getting these numbers, but his high-end figure appears to be an exaggeration. The Internal Revenue Service in 2012 said the figure was $2.3 trillion, and the Joint Committee on Taxation estimated that it had risen to $2.6 trillion in 2015. There are other estimates as well, but none top $2.8 trillion.

“One of the greatest [economic revivals] in the history of our country.”

This is absurd. Trump inherited a low-unemployment, low-inflation economy from Barack Obama. The only thing that changed is that Trump no longer dismissed the economic data as fake.

I don't think any president in nine months has done the job that we've done, and that includes bills being passed by Congress. You look at what's passed by the Senate, by the House, I think we're close to 70 bills, maybe over 70 bills. It almost a record.”

Repeated 8 times

Trump, unlike many presidents in their 10th month, has signed no major legislation. When Trump made his remarks, he has signed 82 bills, most of which were minor. Just among recent presidents, Jimmy Carter, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton had signed more bills than Trump at this point in their presidencies.

“Just so you understand, the countries aren't putting their finest in there. They're not putting their best and their greatest and their finest in there.”

Repeated 1 time

The diversity visa fraud system has had instances of fraud but countries do not nominate or select people to participate.

“The thing I'm most proud about... companies are starting to come back into our country”

Repeated 55 times

Trump keeps taking credit for projects that were long in the works before he became president. For example, he repeatedly claims credit for Ford’s decision to abandon its plans to open a factory in Mexico and instead expand its Michigan plant. But analysts say Ford’s decision has more to do with the company’s long-term goal — particularly, its plans to invest in electric vehicles — than the administration. Foxconn considered investing in U.S.-based facilities since 2014, though its initial plans to invest in Pennsylvania didn't pan out. Trump keeps celebrating the company's decision, but the Wisconsin Legislature had not yet approved the $3 billion incentives package amid concerns from taxpayers.

“This guy would be tied up forever in the court system. You look at some of the cases that are going on forever and you have them dead to rights? Now, the justice system has to go quicker and it has to be, really, stronger and fairer. Probably has to be fairer too.”

Repeated 1 time

An examination of 23 major terrorism cases conducted through the courts since the Sept. 11 attacks finds the process took less than two years — or even a year. The longest case took 35 months. One case — the failed Times Square bomber — was completed in just seven weeks. The average duration between indictment and conviction of the 23 cases is 16.2 months. Many militants ended up pleading guilty, which attests to the strength of the government’s case. Except in a handful of indictments, it’s difficult to see much evidence for Trump’s claim that some cases "are going on forever."

“That dossier which is totally fake and made up – it’s like a novel – but that dossier is a disgrace and it should not have been allowed to be used.”

Repeated 3 times

While the dossier commissioned by Fusion GPS for Democrats contained salacious elements, broad portions have proven to be largely correct. Fusion has said the former British spy who wrote it received $168,000. The FBI was sufficiently impressed that it considered pay him for additional research.

“They’re big tax cuts – the biggest cuts in the history of our country, actually.”

Repeated 40 times

Trump’s tax cut would be nearly 0.9 percent of the gross domestic product, meaning it would be far smaller than President Ronald Reagan’s tax cut in 1981, which was 2.89 percent of GDP. Trump’s tax cut, if enacted in law, would be the eighth largest tax cut — and even smaller than two tax cuts passed under Barack Obama.

The tax bill is "really not for the rich; it’s for the middle class and it’s for jobs.”

Repeated 1 time

No matter how you slice it, the superwealthy do rather well under the House GOP proposal. Not only do they benefit from a reduction in tax rates, but there are numerous other provisions that benefits the wealthy, including repeal of the alternative minimum tax and lower rate for pass-through entities. The top one percent end up with about 47 percent of the tax cuts, according to the Tax Policy Center.

“I think for $18 billion or less, we're gonna have a great wall.”

During the campaign, Trump said the wall would cost $8 billion -- and Mexico would pay for it. Most private estimates say it will cost $20-25 billion.

“Drugs are pouring into our country. A lot of them are coming in through the southern border and the wall will be a tremendous tool to help facilitate the ending of the drugs coming in.”

Repeated 12 times

Trump claims a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico will help stop illegal drugs from being trafficked into the country. But a wall will have virtually no effect on drug trafficking. That's because the majority of drugs are driven across the border through legal points of entry, or smuggled in underground tunnels.

“We have a big one, we have a Broadcom, which is one of the Fortune 100 companies.”

Repeated 2 times

Broadcom was once on the Fortune 500, but fell off in recent years.

“When you think about Dakota, that was 42,000 jobs right there, that was just one small thing they did right at the very beginning, and we’ve done many of them.”

Repeated 19 times

Trump appears to be combining two disputed figures — 28,000 jobs for Keystone XL and 12,000 for the Dakota Access Pipeline-- and then hyping it even more. We have looked closely at the Keystone numbers, and the same methodological issues appear to apply to the Dakota estimates. The actual number of Keystone construction jobs, for instance, is just 3,900 on an annualized basis — and other jobs have already been created (such as for building high-strength line pipe.) In the context of the U.S. economy, which just in October added 261,000 jobs, these are not many jobs.

“NAFTA is a disaster. NAFTA is killing us.”

Repeated 14 times

Trump’s attack on North American Free Trade Agreement is over the top. It is often difficult to separate out the impact of trade agreements on jobs, compared to other, broader economic trends. But the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service in 2015 concluded the “net overall effect of NAFTA on the U.S. economy appears to have been relatively modest, primarily because trade with Canada and Mexico accounts for a small percentage of U.S. GDP,” though it noted “there were worker and firm adjustment costs as the three countries adjusted to more open trade and investment among their economies.”

“This is real collusion and dishonesty. Major violation of Campaign Finance Laws and Money Laundering - where is our Justice Department?”

Repeated 1 time

Trump is referring to a financial arrangement the Clinton campaign had with the Democratic National Committee, which was similar to one the Trump campaign had with the Republican National Committee. It's no coincidence Trump would raise false charges of money laundering shortly after his former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, was indicted for money laundering.

“Our corporate tax rate is 60 percent higher than our average competition.”

Repeated 19 times

Trump exaggerates about corporate taxes. The U.S. certainly has one of the highest statutory corporate tax rates in the world, currently pegged as high as 39.1 percent when including state taxes. (The federal rate is 35 percent.) But also matters is the actual tax a company pays, after deductions and tax benefits. That is known as the effective tax rate, and the U.S. effective tax rate is 27.1 percent. For China, the statutory corporate tax rate is around 25 percent and effective tax rate is around 10 percent, according to Congressional Budget Office.

“We're imposing a one-time low tax to bring back all of that corporate money. Now, we think it's probably in the neighborhood of $4 trillion will be brought back into our economy, into our country.”

Repeated 16 times

There are no official, current numbers on the profits held overseas by U.S. companies, just estimates. The White House would not respond to a query on where Trump is getting these numbers, but his high-end figure appears to be an exaggeration. The Internal Revenue Service in 2012 said the figure was $2.3 trillion, and the Joint Committee on Taxation estimated that it had risen to $2.6 trillion in 2015. There are other estimates as well, but none top $2.8 trillion.

“The Council of Economic Advisers estimates that the corporate tax reforms would increase average household income by $4,000.”

Repeated 3 times

The CEA report has been widely criticized for the $4,000 estimate, including by the economist whose work is cited in making this forecast.

“In the history of our country, no President, during their entire term, has cut more regulations than we've cut. We've cut that in 10 months, and we have a lot more to do.”

Repeated 10 times

This claim cannot be verified as there is not enough data for a comparison.

“We're one of the highest-taxed countries in the world.”

Repeated 31 times

Trump almost never gets this correct. The Pew Research Center, using 2014 data, found that the tax bill for Americans, under various scenarios, is below average for developed countries. In 2014, according to comparative tables of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), revenue as a percentage of the gross domestic product — the broadest measure of the economy — was 26 percent for the United States. Out of 34 countries, that put the United States in the bottom third — and well below the OECD average of 34.4 percent.

You look at China, they're at 15 percent. You look at some countries, they're quite a bit lower than that.”

Repeated 19 times

Trump exaggerates about corporate taxes. The U.S. certainly has one of the highest statutory corporate tax rates in the world, currently pegged as high as 39.1 percent when including state taxes. (The federal rate is 35 percent.) But also matters is the actual tax a company pays, after deductions and tax benefits. That is known as the effective tax rate, and the U.S. effective tax rate is 27.1 percent. For China, the statutory corporate tax rate is around 25 percent and effective tax rate is around 10 percent, according to {Congressional Budget Office}.

“It will be the biggest tax reduction in the history of our country.”

Repeated 40 times

Trump’s tax cut would be nearly 0.9 percent of the gross domestic product, meaning it would be far smaller than President Ronald Reagan’s tax cut in 1981, which was 2.89 percent of GDP. Trump’s tax cut, if enacted in law, would be the eighth largest tax cut — and even smaller than two tax cuts passed under Barack Obama.

“The stock market is at an all-time high.”

Repeated 57 times

This is a flip-flop for Trump. Before he was elected, he dismissed the stock-market performance under Obama as “artificial” and “a bubble."

“Unemployment is at its lowest level in almost 17 years.”

Repeated 33 times

Trump now uses data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics unemployment rate to say this, which is a flip-flop from his previous claims dismissing the BLS unemployment rate as "nonsense."

“Jobs have been offshored to so many countries that were now coming back, and now those jobs and those companies are coming back to our great American home.”

Repeated 55 times

Trump keeps taking credit for projects that were long in the works before he became president. For example, he repeatedly claims credit for Ford’s decision to abandon its plans to open a factory in Mexico and instead expand its Michigan plant. But analysts say Ford’s decision has more to do with the company’s long-term goal — particularly, its plans to invest in electric vehicles — than the administration. It’s easier for companies to find highly skilled workers to build new products, such as electric cars, in the United States than in Mexico. Fiat Chrysler's plan to invest $1 billion for a factory in Michigan had been in the works for more than a year and had nothing to do with Trump. Foxconn considered investing in U.S.-based facilities since 2014, though its initial plans to invest in Pennsylvania didn't pan out.

“Broadcom Limited is a 100 -- Fortune 100 company -- one of the really great, great companies.”

Repeated 2 times

Broadcom was once on the Fortune 500, but fell off in recent years.

“We're telling people 'Made in the USA' -- it's a big deal now -- we're bringing it back. When I was growing up, when I was a young boy, you'd say, 'Made in the USA,' and that mean something. Well, it means something again.

Repeated 23 times

Trump himself has a long history of outsourcing a variety of his products and has acknowledged doing so. Even during Trump’s “Made in America” week, when he urged manufacturers and consumers to “buy American, hire American,” his family’s company continued to rely on foreign workers. Another of Trump’s golf courses recently filed a request to hire 10 foreign workers to be waiters. Further, the fashion line of Ivanka Trump, the president’s daughter and adviser to the president, is out of step with the principles championed by her father.

“I've already slashed more unnecessary job-killing regulations than any President in history. That includes their entire term, and I’ve only been here for about 10 months. And we're not finished yet, believe me. We're not even close.”

Repeated 10 times

This claim cannot be verified as there is not enough data for a comparison, but it's especially a stretch to say he's done more in nine month than any full term president.

“We're working to give the American people a giant tax cut for Christmas. We are giving them a big beautiful Christmas present in the form of a tremendous tax cut. It will be the biggest cut in the history of our country.”

Repeated 40 timea 

Trump’s tax cut would be nearly 0.9 percent of the gross domestic product, meaning it would be far smaller than President Ronald Reagan’s tax cut in 1981, which was 2.89 percent of GDP. Trump’s tax cut, if enacted in law, would be the eighth largest tax cut — and even smaller than two tax cuts passed under Barack Obama.

“We will bring back trillions and trillions of dollars that's now parked overseas so that money can be put to work rebuilding the United States of America, as opposed to rebuilding other parts of the world.”

Repeated 16 times

There are no official, current numbers on the profits held overseas by U.S. companies, just estimates. The White House would not respond to a query on where Trump is getting these numbers, but his high-end figure appears to be an exaggeration. The Internal Revenue Service in 2012 said the figure was $2.3 trillion, and the Joint Committee on Taxation estimated that it had risen to $2.6 trillion in 2015. There are other estimates as well, but none top $2.8 trillion.

“It'll be the largest tax cuts in the history of our country by far.”

Repeated 40 times

Trump’s tax cut would be nearly 0.9 percent of the gross domestic product, meaning it would be far smaller than President Ronald Reagan’s tax cut in 1981, which was 2.89 percent of GDP. Trump’s tax cut, if enacted in law, would be the eighth largest tax cut — and even smaller than two tax cuts passed under Barack Obama.

“Right now, other countries are so far below us. And then when you wonder, you see all these companies leaving, one after the other -- they leave -- that's not going to be happening.”

Repeated 19 times

Trump exaggerates about corporate taxes. The U.S. certainly has one of the highest statutory corporate tax rates in the world, currently pegged as high as 39.1 percent when including state taxes. (The federal rate is 35 percent.) But also matters is the actual tax a company pays, after deductions and tax benefits. That is known as the effective tax rate, and the U.S. effective tax rate is 27.1 percent. For China, the statutory corporate tax rate is around 25 percent and effective tax rate is around 10 percent, according to Congressional Budget Office.

“Under our plan, we'll go from being one of the highest taxed nations in the world to one of the lowest”

Repeated 31 times

Trump almost never gets this correct. The Pew Research Center, using 2014 data, found that the tax bill for Americans, under various scenarios, is below average for developed countries. In 2014, according to comparative tables of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), revenue as a percentage of the gross domestic product — the broadest measure of the economy — was 26 percent for the United States. Out of 34 countries, that put the United States in the bottom third — and well below the OECD average of 34.4 percent.

 

Know of a Trump lie that constitutes serious misconduct? Tell us now!